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Habituate

distinguishable dance music only!

Little is known about Tad Wily other than the fact that he is responsible for the Tape Love EP from Smash Hit Music. Habituate had the pleasure of this exclusive interview and mix.

Artwork by Julius Tanag.

1. Isotope 217 – <<
2. Munga – Freak (Munga's Back In The Jungle Baby)
3. Linntronix – Cool Out (Refresh)
4. Christophe – The Force (Lukas mix)
5. Justin Winks vs. Casio Social Club – Rock the Discotheque
6. Albert Cabrera – Ulticut Ups!!! Extreme Cut Up
7. The House Rockers – Everybody Do It
8. The Glimmers – U Rocked My World (Pete Herbert & Tristan Da Cunha Mix)
9. Konk – Your Life (Party Mix)
10. Master Plan – Electric Baile (Commercial Mix)
11. Shep' N Wily – One Night In Puzon
12. Ark – Stoptheball
13. Dimlite – Es Gschänk (Outro)

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Q: What style of music do you produce?

A: “I’m not a big fan of genres… but if I had to choose I’d love it to be Swamp Pop, because it’s the coolest genre name out there, but I’m afraid it rather fits Beatport’s ‘Indie Dance’ description. Or you can think of it as a mess done right.”

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Q: When it comes to music production, what era’s and artists do you look to for inspiration?

A: “No artists in particular, really. I tend to look for single tunes that have something unusual or inspiring in them. There’s plenty of little gems around that don’t have any important artist name written all over it, but have awful loads of character. I’ve got a soft spot for late 70’s Post Punk/No Wave stuff, early 80’s House, or Rap/Boogie tunes and various fusions of these. I’m also a big fan of weird things and small imperfections; vocals out of tune, distorted hi-hats, noisy guitar cables, etc. These things often add up to the uniqueness of stuff, which to some degree gone missing when people started to produce preliminarily on digital setups.”

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Q: What would be the ideal atmosphere or party you would like to have your productions played at?

A: “Hot chicks, a few drinks and decent sound-system usually do it for me, ha ha!”

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Q: From my knowledge you were born and raised in Poland, correct? Why did you decide to relocate and base yourself out of London?

A: “It wasn’t a planned decision at first, really. I was invited to exhibit my artworks in a town near London back in 2003 and after the event was over I jumped on train and half an hour later, sipping tea, I was staring at Norman Foster’s Gherkin. For some reason going back to Poland on permanent basis wasn’t on the menu anymore. But I’ve been popping over to my hometown in Poland to make use of small recording studio I have got there with my buds, or for some summer beach action.”

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Q: As a producer you have been somewhat shrouded in mystery, was it your intention or was it circumstance?

A: ‘Well, it was circumstances at the beginning, however Layne from Smash Hit Music quickly noticed I’m being viewed this way and suggested we could play on it. To me quality-wise the releases should speak for itself, without much need to present the artist behind it, so I accepted it right away. You gotta love comments like ‘Who the fuck is this bloke?’ in times when information spreads so easily via Internet. Not that I would go as far as some do and wear some sort of biker helmet, or eyeball thing at each gig.”

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Q: Has your life as an artist and sculptor seeped over to your dance music endeavors?

A: “It did in some ways. One of main things I learned from making sculptures was that getting from a rough shape to fine details and that polishing stuff up can’t make you afraid of doing some sudden, radical changes, if need be. Sometimes you need to break things apart in the middle of work, even when it shapes up nicely, because deep in your guts you feel it’s going work better in the end.”

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Q: Have you worked on any multimedia projects combining music and sculpture or do you plan to do so in the future?

A: “Yeah, I played in several live bands and there was a lot of audio-visual experiments, performances and crazy stuff back in the art school days. Apart from undeniable fun, we sometimes had a bit of a problem to judge the quality of it, so moving towards more dance-floor orientated stuff was a relief of some sort. I am still able to smuggle some crazy bits between the lines, but rules are more clear here; wen you see people shake their hips to your track it means you’ve done well. I am planning to get back to some experimental stuff sooner or later, probably under another alias.”

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Q: I would consider your break to have been your release on Smash Hits Music, “Tape Love.”
Would you say so? Did the reaction to this EP exceed your expectations?

A: “I wouldn’t go as far and call it a break. To me, since the first release it’s sort of steady progress towards some wider recognition. I was quite stoked though, to receive great feedback from people I value highly like Marcuss Marr, Roy Dank from Wurst, or Sasa from In Flagranti. It was really encouraging. Some radio plays in stations like KCRW or Ministry of Sound, plus all the charts, DJ mixes that tracks from the EP went to were a very pleasant surprise as well.”

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Q: What elements did you use in your production of Tape Love?

A: “Initially I planned to use mainly air and fire, but there are some earthy, water-ish bits here and there too, he he.
The little story behind the title track was that my mate popped in one evening with a big bag full of old cassette tapes he just picked up off the street. Apart from super cool designs, one of them had some info written on it that begged to be used as lyrics: lubricated, smooth running, gives you 60 minutes of playing time, and high energy. My additions to these epic, sexy lines were fast forward to the best bit and change a side. It is one of the tracks I had fully in my mind before I even started a first draft.”

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Q: Your next release, under the pseudonym “Shep N’ Wily,” is on one of my top labels, Retrofit.
How did you connect with Jay Shepheard and how was it tag teaming it with him on production? Is collaboration a new experience for you?

A: “We’ve met on several occasions in past lives, so it was easy connecting this time. Few years ago Jay moved to Poland and lived in my hometown for a few months (that’s where the name ‘Sopot Connection’ on our first Retrofit EP together actually comes from). Being already a producer with some releases under his belt he gave me some early feedback and valuable bits of advice while I was working on my first EP and we’ve stayed in touch ever since. As a former band player I often miss the collaborative factor when producing my own stuff. You need to be able to force your ideas through, but in the same time be flexible, know when to let things go and let someone else play their part. Meeting half way brings surprising results for both parties, which is awesome. That’s how I feel it works in our case.”

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Q: I see you are on the krankbrother Agency roster now. How recent is that and how is it panning out for you?

A: “It’s a bit early to say anything, since the agency is just a couple of months old, but the boys throw some wicked loft parties in London and have a nice crop of young, talented producers, so it should work well.”

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Q: Many dance music artists claim no inspiration from club culture, is that the case for you?
Does London over Poland have more interesting nightlife?

A: “When I was in Poland I used to live a couple of minutes walk from the best venue in town, regularly hosting some cool DJ’s and acts from around the world. Relaxed age restrictions and knowing the guys at the door helped me to almost grow up there. In London there’s obviously crazy amount of great stuff happening almost every night, but I’m slightly missing the atmosphere of a place you’re so familiar with.”

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Q: This may sound like a job interview sort of question, so to avoid the stereotypical and mundane connotations this sort of question has please feel free to add as many absurd bits of information or misinformation as you’d like.
Where do you see yourself 10 years down the line?

A: “Rich, fat and not giving a fuck. Quite the opposite of who I am now.”

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